Capitol Hill Event: Lexington Institute Defense Acquisition Reform – 6.3.16

#KEM agrees with our strategic partners at The Lexington Institute that acquisition reform is crucial to sustaining the technological edge of America’s military. 

Learn More about #KEM Capabilities:  Acquisition Management

We don’t believe there is a single “silver bullet” that will improve or energize the process, rather it takes solid execution by the Requirements, Acquisition, Budget/Congress, and Private Sector communities all working together.  One way we work with our clients on complex programs is to help them improve their schedule and ultimately reduce their cost by executing the following:

  • Focus on compressing the drawn out requirements development process which is characterized by continual debate and changes in requirements causing ongoing delays.
  • Create a Definitive Requirements Process.
  • Coordinate disciplined execution by the Requirements, Acquisition, Budget/Congress, and Private Sector communities all working together.

If we want to improve the schedule, a focus on the requirements process is required.  The good news is that the requirements piece is the easiest one to change.

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Capitol Hill Event: Defense Acquisition Reform – 6.3.16

The Lexington Institute (@LexNextDC) conducted a Capitol Hill forum at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Friday, June 3rd to discuss defense acquisition reform opportunities.

“Acquisition reform is crucial to sustaining the technological edge of America’s military. With defense budgets capped and other nations investing heavily in new warfighting technology, the United States cannot allow its military investments to be stalled or wasted by inefficient practices.

The defense department’s Better Buying Power initiatives have made a good start at slowing cost increases in major weapons programs and improving the professionalism of the acquisition workforce.  But the department needs further improvement if it is to be a truly efficient buyer of military hardware and services.

In particular, the Department of Defense needs to become a customer that can unlock the full innovative potential of American industry.  That requires both incentivizing traditional suppliers to perform and reaching out to non-traditional suppliers.  The government-industry team needs to minimize tensions and build trust so that American warfighting technology is unsurpassed in its performance and cost-effectiveness.”